Stir Up Some Spicy-Sweet Vizcaya Grog For Black Tot Day

Tomorrow is Black Tot Day—the anniversary of a dark day on the seas, when the British Navy ceased issuance of a daily rum ration to its sailors—and in honor of those brave seafaring men for whom a glass of grog was a welcome interruption of the nautical routine, we’ve got a recipe for you.

Grog began as a way to make more palatable the watered-down rum that Naval bigwigs ordered as a preventative against drunkenness.  Because water on board ship was often foul, a mixture of citrus, sugar and spices was added to the drink. The use of lime or lemon not only helped flavor standard-issue rum drinks, it also helped stave off scurvy. Modern men and women who partake of grog, however, do so because it’s a tasty way to enjoy Vizcaya VXOP, as a novel change of pace from taking the ultimate sipping rum neat or on the rocks.

There are nearly as many recipes for grog as there are tales o’ the sea. We present to you a basic template, which we hope you’ll experiment with and make your own. The proportions of this recipe closely follow those of the original Naval grog, and acidic lime juice brightens all of its flavors. While the spices will help illuminate the underlying complexity of the Vizcaya, feel free to eliminate them or to experiment with other garnishes.

Sweet and Spicy Vizcaya VXOP Grog

2 oz. Vizcaya VXOP Cask 21 Rum
1 T lime juice
1 T simple syrup or demerara sugar
6-8 oz water, depending on taste
pinch of nutmeg, cinnamon or black pepper

Stir all ingredients together in a highball glass. If you like, enjoy with the traditional Saturday toast of the Royal Navy: “Here’s to wives and sweethearts—may they never meet!”

Published in: on July 30, 2010 at 1:19 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Commemorate Black Tot Day with Vizcaya VXOP

This Saturday, rum lovers across the globe will raise a glass of their favorite spirit in tribute to a sober anniversary: Black Tot Day.

It was 40 years ago, on July 31st, 1970, that the British Royal Navy discontinued its centuries-old policy of issuing a daily rum ration to sailors. The practice of handing out rum to naval crewmembers was first begun in 1655, becoming standard practice by 1731. Originally, beer was the ration of choice—a gallon a day, according to historical records—but cargo and spoilage issues soon made this impractical on increasingly long voyages. After the British conquest of Jamaica, sailors were given a “gill” or quarter-pint of straight rum, twice a day, in the afternoon and evening, in order to buoy their moods on the long, disheartening journeys.

Canny sailors, however, began to save up their rations, or “tots,” as they were called, in order to drink them all at once and feel the intoxicating effects. In response, Admiral Edward Vernon, who was known by the nickname “Old Grog” because he wore a grogram cloak, ordered in 1740 that the ration be diluted—four parts water to one part alcohol. Sugar and lime were added to improve the flavor, and the resultant mixture soon became known as “grog” as a backhanded tribute to the admiral.

The tot was valued on board ships not only for its own sake, but because it could be bartered or given to other sailors, operating as a form of currency. In fact, the tot was probably more valuable than money, as there was nowhere on ship to spend real currency, while tots were always useful. In true military spirit, a solemn and elaborate ritual sprang up around the issuing of tots. The boatswain’s mate whistled “Up spirits” at 11:00am, after which a procession consisting of the petty officer, the cooper and a detachment of Royal Marines escorted the delivery of the keg of rum to the quarterdeck. There, it was mixed with the water and flavorings before being doled out at noon, when the mate piped “Muster for rum.”

Rum was named the official beverage of the Navy in 1831. Although the portions of the tot varied, the tradition continued for over a century, until the House of Commons ruled in 1970 that the ration was interfering with sailors’ ability to operate the increasingly technological and complex equipment on board ship. Officially abolished in 1970, the tot has nevertheless been celebrated and commemorated by rum enthusiasts and former sailors the world over, typically on July 31st. It is said that on the original Black Tot Day, some ships conducted ceremonies to say farewell to the ration, including one held on the HMS Dolphin that included a coffin and a funereal march; others threw their final ration overboard, either in protest or as an offering to the sea.

Whether you want to protest the discontinuance of the charming, cheerful ritual that accompanied the daily tot, or you would rather see Black Tot Day as a time to salute the generations of rum drinkers who have enjoyed this noble spirit both at sea and on land, do raise your glass of Vizcaya VXOP Cask 21 rum this Saturday. Be it in commemoration or celebration—cheers.

Published in: on July 29, 2010 at 9:59 AM  Leave a Comment  
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The Many Renaissances of Rum Culminate with Vizcaya VXOP

Rum is one of the oldest spirits in the world, with a fascinating and storied tradition. Even Marco Polo recorded an account of tasting “a very good wine of sugar” offered to him in what is now Iran, in the 14th Century. A slightly more modern origin of rum is described by spirits historian Anthony Dias Blue in his Complete Book of Spirits: A Guide to their History, Production and Enjoyment. Blue quotes a document from 1651 which describes the fermentation of rum in Barbados: “The chief fuddling they make in the island is Rumbullion, alias Kill-Divil, and this is made of sugar canes distilled, a hot, hellish and terrible liquor.”

Thankfully, the process of distilling rum has become much more refined, and today’s rums, like Vizcaya VXOP Cask 21, are a vast improvement over such “kill-divil,” or “demon water,” as rum was once called.

Rum has had a valuable place in American history—some estimates say that before the American Revolutionary War, every man, woman and child in the colonies drank an average of over 13 liters of rum per year—as well as in British. One of the most abiding associations with rum is as a ration issued to Naval seamen, after the British fleet captured the island of Jamaica. Mixed with lime juice, sugar and water into a concoction called grog, the daily rum ration was a staple of seafaring life until 1970. Today, the rum ration is still issued on special occasions such as marriages or births within the Royal Family.

In the mid-20th Century, rum enjoyed a renaissance thanks to the burgeoning Tiki culture, and was featured in such drinks as the mai tai and the Zombie. Americans fell in love with fruity, tropical drinks that complemented Asian-inspired food and could be sipped pool- or beachside—or even just in a suburban backyard lit by tiki torches. Those who were slightly too young to enjoy tiki drinks may have discovered rum through another pop-cultural phenomenon: the pina colada, which soared in popularity after the Rupert Holmes song “Escape (The Pina Colada Song)” hit the charts.

Today, rum has become more sophisticated than ever before. Take Vizcaya VXOP, the ultimate sipping rum. This is no ordinary rum, to be mixed and drunk and forgotten about. Vizcaya is a rum that commands your full attention and all your senses. Enjoy it neat or on the rocks, with or without a good cigar, or take the time to craft a cocktail with premium ingredients that will showcase the spicy, intricate notes inherent in Vizcaya VXOP Cask 21 rum.

Whether you enjoy your drinks with a paper umbrella or a wedge of lime, while gazing out over still waters or rough, treat yourself to the very finest in spirits—Vizcaya VXOP Cask 21 rum. Here’s to the history of that noble spirit, rum!

Published in: on June 24, 2010 at 1:00 PM  Leave a Comment  
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